studyabroadtanzania2012

Monduli

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This weekend we camped in a Maasai Village (yes, I know I spelt it wrong the first time haha). After we settled in we went on a couple hour walk around the area. The scenery was beautiful! A Massai child invited us into her home, which was a tiny straw hut. Her whole family was crowded inside, including her mother. The Massai speak their own language so there wasn’t much communication between us but we did manage to make-out that there was 1 bedroom for 6 people, the “kitchen” was a couple pieces of wood with a pot on top, and surprisingly enough there was a little area inside the house where the goats would stay. They allowed us to take some pictures, however, because it was dark in the hut I didn’t realize that the mother was breast feeding This weekend we camped in a Maasai Village (yes, I know I spelt it wrong the first time haha). After we settled in we went on a couple hour walk around the area. The scenery was beautiful! A Massai child invited us into her home, which was a tiny straw hut. Her whole family was crowded inside, including her mother. The Massai speak their own language so there wasn’t much communication between us but we did manage to make-out that there was 1 bedroom for 6 people, the “kitchen” was a couple pieces of wood with a pot on top, and surprisingly enough there was a little area inside the house where the goats would stay. They allowed us to take some pictures, however, because it was dark in the hut I didn’t realize that the mother was breast feeding her baby in the picture. I’m still going to post the picture because it is a great picture and so real but I’m just giving you a little forewarning. After the walk we ate lunch and then headed to the Massai market. This market is considerable different from the market we have been going to in Arusha. The market in Arusha sells goods for tourists. The market we went to in Monduli was interactions and trades between Massia people themselves. They were trading/buying goods such as sugar, coffee, tea, fruit, vegetables, cows, goats, matches, flashlights, shoes, clothes, ect. I loved being at this market, it was a truly authentic learning experience. We were learning how the Massai people live by actually being there and seeing it. We even went into one of their “movie theaters”, which was a straw hut that had people standing around a tv watching a foreign movie. I bought an avocado from one of them Massai women, it was by far the best avocado I have ever had. I loved the chaos and realness of it all, I might even be so bold as to say that it was one of my favorite things I’ve done here so far. The next day we woke up early for a 5 hour hike up Monduli Mountain. The hike was steep and hard but I was apart of the group that made it up to the very top! Unfortunately it was foggy and rainy so we couldn’t see the beautiful view of Kilimanjaro. A few of us yoga fans did a little yoga at the top of the mountain. If it would have been clear that day Kilimanjaro would have been in the background of my yoga picture. On the way home Sunday we stopped at a glassblowing factory that makes all of its products using recycled glass, mostly from wine bottles. This business was founded to provide jobs to disabled people who are struggling in the job market. All the employes that work there are either deaf or physically impaired. The artwork was beautiful and I loved the concept of the whole business; recycling, helping those that are less fortunate, art. Overall the weekend was a success! This is my last week here and I already know I’m going to miss this place so much, I hope to be able to come back someday.

Morgan Steele

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